Friday Public Affairs Discussion Group Logo

European Terrorism Past and Present

 

 
Kenneth F. Ledford, Ph.D., J.D.- Associate Professor of History and Law, Case Western Reserve University







Friday November 2, 2007
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Crawford Hall - Room 9
Inamori Center
Case Western Reserve University

Americans appear to think terrorism is something new and imported – in spite of events such as the Oklahoma City bombing.  From the IRA to Spain’s ETA; French Algerians to the Italian Red Brigade; Europeans have far more experience with such threats.

This Fall is the 30th anniversary of the dramatic events of Fall 1977, when elements of the Red Army faction in Germany engaged in a spectacular wave of terrorist acts in an attempt to free the leaders of the group, Andreas Baader and Ulrike Meinhoff, from Stammheim prison.  Professor Ledford has organized a conference, film screening, and other events to consider what we can learn from that experience.  He will give a preview, and lead discussion of what we might learn from the past, at our gathering.

The Friday Lunch is a brown-bag event open to all. Cookies and some beverages are provided

The remainder of this e-mail reports what we know about the schedule for the rest of the semester. We will be sending out announcements each week. If you would prefer not to receive the announcements, please inform Dr. Andrew Lucker, Associate Director of the Center for Policy Studies, by e-mail (andrew.lucker@case.edu).


About Our Guest

Kenneth Ledford is a social historian of modern Germany, from 1789 to the present. His research interests focus primarily upon processes of class formation, particularly the emergence and decline of the profound influence of the educated, liberal middle-class of education, the Bildungsbürgertum. The salient ideology of this social group was classical liberalism, whose vocabulary both shaped and was shaped by the primary social institution of the Bürgertum, law and the legal order. Thus, he has written about German lawyers in private practice, and his present work is on a book about the Prussian judiciary between 1848 and 1918; in all his work, a clearer analysis of the complex interplay among state, civil society, and the ideology of the state ruled by law (Rechtsstaat) remains the goal. Kenneth Ledford's teaching interests extend beyond German history since 1789 to include the history of the European middle classes, the history of the professions, European legal history, other processes of class formation including German and European labor history, as well as the history of European international relations and diplomatic history. He enjoys interdisciplinary intellectual work by belonging to the faculties of the College of Arts and Sciences as well as the School of Law, and by participating in both the International Studies and German Studies programs within the College.

Friday Lunch and Other Public Affairs Upcoming Topics and Speakers:


November 9: Jane Platten, Director of the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections, on Can the machines work, securely? Will the poll-workers know how to operate them? Will new rules about identification deprive people of their right to vote?: A Post Election Report.

November 16: Journalistic Ethics. Ted Gup, Shirley Wormser Professor of Journalism at Case Western Reserve University and Chris Sherridan, former associate editor and award-winning editorial writer and columnist for the Cleveland Plain Dealer and special assistant to CWRU President Barbara Snyder

November 23: Thanksgiving Break

November 30: Nico Lacetara, Assistant Professor of Economics, will talk about, "What Motivates Blood Donors?"

December 7: TBA

The Friday Lunch will resume for the Spring semester on January 18, with Robert Strassfeld, Professor of Law, leading a discussion on 'How to End a War.

The Friday Lunch discussions are held on the lower (ground) level of
Crawford Hall.  Visitors with mobility issues may find it easiest to take advantage of special arrangements we have made.  On most Fridays, a few parking spaces in the V.I.P. lot in between Crawford Hall and Amasa Stone Chapel are held for participants in the lunch discussion. 

Visitors then can avoid walking up the hill to the first floor of Crawford by entering the building on the ground level, through the garage area under the building.  The further door on the left in that garage will be left unlocked during the period before the Friday lunch.  On occasion, parking will be unavailable because of other university events.

For more information about these and other Center for Policy Studies programs, please see http://policy.case.edu.

October 29, 2007

A weekly newsletter published by the Center for Policy Studies, Case Western Reserve University. If you would like to not receive this weekly e-mail or you would like to submit items for inclusion please send a notice to: pubpol@case.edu.

Upcoming Events

Symposium on “Terrorism in Europe: The ‘German Autumn’ of 1977 after Thirty Years”

BELINDA DAVIS
RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

KARIN BAUER
MCGILL UNIVERSITY

KARRIN M. HANSHEW
MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

FILM SERIES

Sunday, November 4, 2007, Reception 4:30, Lecture 5:00, Clark 309:

Prof. Belinda Davis, Department of History, Rutgers University, “The Many Lives of Terror: Political Activists, the RAF, the State, and the Media in West Germany”

Monday, November 5, 2007, Reception 4:30, Talks and Screening 5:00, Clapp 108:

Viewing of the film Deutschland im Herbst (Germany in Autumn)(1978), a famous collage of short films by the leading German film-makers of the 1970s (German with English subtitles); introduction and discussion leadership by Profs. Ledford and Vees-Gulani

Tuesday, November 6, 2007, Reception 4:30, Lecture 5:00, Clark 309:

Prof. Karin Bauer, Department of German Studies, McGill University, “Radical Visions: Aesthetic Responses to Ulrike Meinhof and the RAF”

Wednesday, November 7, 2007, Reception 4:30, Lecture 5:00, Clark 309:

Prof. Karrin M. Hanshew, Department of History, Michigan State University, “The ‘German Autumn’ as Turning Point, or, What the West Germans Learned from Terrorism”

Thursday, November 8, 2007, Reception 4:30, Talks and Screening 5:00, Clark 309:

Viewing of the film Was tun, wenn’s brennt? (What Do You Do When It’s Burning?)(2001) on the continuation of protest culture into the 1980s and its meaning for contemporary German culture and identity (German with English subtitles); introduction and discussion leadership by Profs. Ledford and Vees-Gulani

The Invisible Primary: Money, Media & Polls in the 2008 Presidential Race

Thomas Patterson, Ph.D.
Bradlee Professor of Government and the Press,
John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Monday November 12, 2007
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Ford Auditorium - Allen Memorial Medical Library
4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Case Western Reserve University

THOMAS E. PATTERSON is Bradlee Professor of Government and the Press. His most recent book, The Vanishing Voter, looks at the causes and consequences of declining electoral participation. His book on the media's political role, Out of Order, received the American Political Science Association's Graber Award as the best book of the decade in political communication. An earlier book, The Unseeing Eye, was named by the American Association for Public Opinion Research as one of the 50 most influential books on public opinion in the past half century. He also is author of Mass Media Election and two general American government texts: The American Democracy and We the People. His articles have appeared in Political Communication, Journal of Communication, and other academic journals, as well as in the popular press. His research has been funded by the Ford, Markle, Smith-Richardson, Pew, and National Science foundations. Patterson received his PhD from the University of Minnesota in 1971.

Center for Policy Studies Events

All Events >>

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30


About the Friday Lunch Newsletter

Submissions for the Friday Lunch Newsletter may be e-mailed to pubpol@case.edu. All submissions must be received at least a week prior to inclusion in the weekly e-mail and will be reviewed for timeliness and relevance to the Center for Policy Studies audience.

E-mail pubpol@case.edu.

Case Western Reserve University logo

For more information, or if you have trouble reading this page, go to the Friday Lunch web site.